A Story From The Stands – What Have Former Nebraska Football Players Learned From The Game – Frosty

You can be sure plenty of folks will remember “the play.” It came in the second quarter of the 1973 Orange Bowl game against Notre Dame when Johnny Rodgers threw a touchdown pass to Frosty Anderson.

“I wasn’t supposed to be in for that play,” Frosty Anderson said. “We knew the play would be there and it would be an easy six.” It was and the rest of the night was a disaster for the Fighting Irish. But, that’s not the game that Frosty thinks of as his best game.

“The Wisconsin game was my best game,” he said. “We kept getting behind and then I finally scored and put Nebraska ahead. I thought that would do it but Wisconsin came back and scored. That’s when Tony Davis went to work with one of his three rushes for about 30 yards each.” Nebraska won.

“Someone came up and made a comment that I had something like nine catches and 160 yards,” Frosty said. “I didn’t think much about it even though it turned out to be an I-back type of performance.”

It’s not surprising Frosty might turn in a memorable performance against a Big 10 team. He comes from Big 10 roots. His father, Forrest, Sr. who was better know as “Forddy” coached basketball at Michigan State. The family moved to Scottsbluff where his dad accepted a basketball coaching position. Frosty became a standout for Scottsbluff and caught the eye of Nebraska coach Jim Ross during a  UFABET หาเงินหลักหมื่น Scottsbluff-Fremont game.

Coach Devaney knew Frosty’s dad from his days as an assistant football coach at Michigan State.

“I always assumed I would be headed for Michigan State but when the Nebraska offer came, I thought what the heck and signed,” he said. Not bad decision when you consider that only two years later, the young Scottsbluff star would be wearing a National Championship ring.

Like all freshmen players in those days, Frosty started in the Nebraska freshman football program. That team only had one loss. “We lost to the Kearney State first team,” Frosty said.

“Jim Walden was our freshman football coach,” Frosty said. “He was my first experience with a ‘south-mouth’ and he preached three things: be ag-ile, be mob-ile and be hos-tile. Frosty red-shirted his sophomore year.

“I’m what was known as hope of the second team,” he said. “To play at Nebraska, you have to be top-notch, be accountable for what you do, and be patient. That’s just the way it is.” Frosty got knocked around on the scout team and was “Blackshirt bait” before he earned his day in the Memorial Stadium sun.